The Reviver by Seth Patrick

reviver

Jonah is a Reviver – someone who can revive the dead for a short period of time. In Jonah’s case, he works for a forensic team, so he revives in order to let the victim testify about the events of their death. It’s a well controlled experience, and is used as evidence in courts.

However, during one revival, Jonah experiences something which makes him question exactly what they’re doing.. another presence, which he can’t explain. He’s told it’s just an hallucination, brought about by stress, but Jonah isn’t convinced, and starts to dig deeper. He ends up involved in something much bigger than he expected.

For the majority of the book, this feels like a crime / thriller, with this very interesting twist. The whole issue of Revival is explored, including it’s uses and problems, and it’s this aspect which lifts it well above average. Some reviewers have found the book too slow, but I disagree – there’s a lot of information to give, and aspects of reviving to explore, and I enjoyed this.

Throughout there’s an uneasiness, a suggestion of a supernatural element, and towards the end this becomes more apparent, and there’s a definite switch in the book. I have to admit, this did worry me for a while, because I’ve seen similar books which started to feel.. well, silly. In my opinion though, Seth keeps a realistic tone, and it soon settles into a good ending.

Whilst it would have been possible to keep simply to the idea of forensic revival, I’m not sure how far it could have been taken in the future. I would imagine that the supernatural aspect will feature quite strongly in the next book, and I look forward to finding out where we’re taken next.

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Extinction Game by Gary Gibson

extinction

Science Fiction is an area I dip into occasionally, and Gary Gibson was a new author to me, but when I was offered a copy of Extinction Game to review, something caught my attention, and so I agreed. I wasn’t sure how quickly I’d get to it, but I took a quick peek, and was soon hooked.

The story begins with Jerry Beche, who has managed to survive a deadly world-wide viral attack, and as far as he knows, he’s the only survivor on Earth. Until one day when he’s ‘rescued’, and taken to an island where there are others who have also survived the end of their own alternative Earth. He learns that there an infinite number of alternative Earths, and many of them have had their own apocalyptic event. A small group of survivors have been brought together and trained, and their role is to enter these Earths and rescue data, records, technology etc.

There’s a lot going on from this point – each world the teams visit has it’s own ending or strange future, and Gibson describes each one vividly, including the events leading up to the end of Jerry’s Earth. This was fascinating enough in itself, but we also explore the relationships within the team members, during their visits and in between. They’re an interesting group, with some handling events far better than others.

As well as this, they have to deal with the Authority, the organisation who brought them all together. Who exactly are they, and why do they need the data and technology? Also, where exactly did the ability to enter these other timelines come from?

The mix within this book was just right for me, and I read it within a couple of days. I wanted to find out as much as I could about the alternative worlds, and how it was possible to visit them, but I also found myself invested in the individuals involved, including Jerry. The balance is good, the SF aspect is there, but never weighs down the overall story, and it’s good to see characters being just as important as plot.

I’m going to recommend this one, but maybe especially to those, like me, may be a little wary of Science Fiction. I’m definitely putting some of his other books on my wishlist, and will wait rather impatiently for the sequel.

Visit Tor UK’s blog for some words from Gary, and a free extract.

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The 100 Day 21 by Kass Morgan

This book has to be read after The 100, and if possible, I’d recommend reading them close together. In case you’ve stumbled upon this review, the premise behind The 100 is that it’s set years after a devastating nuclear war on earth, with the last of humanity living on a large spaceship. Those under 18 who commit crimes are kept in Confinement, and then retried on their 18th birthday. 100 of these are sent on a dropship to Earth, to discover whether it’s habitable again.

This book picks up the story 21 days after they’ve arrived, a length of time which could be important if the effects are radiation start to show themselves. At the end of the first book, the teens have discovered that they’re not alone, and that their are in fact other people still living on Earth. Day 21 focuses on the conflict between these two groups as they interact. As with the first book, we still follow Glass, which allows us to keep up with events on the main ship.

I was a little disappointed with the first book, as my expectations were different having heard the TV show discussed on twitter. With this sequel I knew what to expect, and I enjoyed it a lot more. I already knew the characters, and the Earth-born added an extra desirable layer.

As I said in my review of The 100, this is more of a YA read with a touch of SF, whereas the series sounds much darker. If you enjoyed the first book, you definitely need to pick up this sequel. If you weren’t sure about the first, I’d still say give this one a try, as I found it the better book of the two.

 

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The 100 by Kass Morgan

There’s an important issue to mention at the start of this review.. I had heard about the TV series on twitter, and as far as I can tell, this book and it’s sequel are completely different. The show appears to be rather dark, whilst the books are a much lighter YA read.

So…the book is set years after a devastating nuclear war on earth, with the last of humanity living on a large spaceship. Those under 18 who commit crimes are kept in Confinement, and then retried on their 18th birthday. 100 of these are sent on a dropship to Earth, to discover whether it’s habitable again.

The story follows a few of these 100, using short flashbacks to gradually reveal their past. Relationships are explored, both with each other, and in their flashbacks, as they attempt to deal with their new existence.

I’m rather torn about the book, and this may have come down to expectation, as I heard about the TV show first. To me, this is more of a book about teen relationships, and how they deal with these, rather than a SF book about living on a spaceship, and rediscovering Earth. I’m personally not keen on flashbacks, but they are short, and it’s probably the best way to tell the story. Accepted for what it is, however, it’s an enjoyable, rather addictive book. It does end with a cliff-hanger ending, and I was keen to move onto the sequel to find out what came next.

If you have no pre-conceptions, and you’re looking looking for a YA with a touch of SF, then you may enjoy this.

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Revenge and Retribution (The Graham Saga #6) by Anna Belfrage

02_Revenge-RetributionTitle: Revenge and Retribution (Graham Saga #6)
Author: Anna Belfrage
ISBN: 978-1781321751
Publisher: Silverwood Books
First Published: 29th June 2014 (Kindle) / 1st Jul 2014 (paperback)

Rating: Like a Star @ heavenLike a Star @ heavenLike a Star @ heavenLike a Star @ heavenLike a Star @ heaven

Synopsis (from Amazon):
‘Revenge & Retribution’ is the sixth book in Anna Belfrage’s time slip series featuring time traveller Alexandra Lind and her seventeenth century husband, Matthew Graham.

Life in the Colony of Maryland is no sinecure – as Alex and Matthew Graham well know. But nothing in their previous life has prepared them for the mayhem that is about to be unleashed upon them.

Being labelled a witch is not a good thing in 1684, so it is no wonder Alex Graham is aghast at having such insinuations thrown at her. Even worse, it’s Matthew’s brother-in-law, Simon Melville, who points finger at her.

Not that the ensuing hearing is her main concern, because nowadays Alex’s entire life is tainted by the fear of what Philip Burley will do to them once he gets hold of them. On a sunny May afternoon, Philip finally achieves his aim and over the course of the coming days Alex sees her whole life unravelling, leaving her family permanently maimed.

As if all this wasn’t enough, Alex also has to cope with the loss of one of her sons. Forcibly adopted by the former Susquehannock, Samuel is dragged from Alex’s arms to begin a new life in the wilderness.

How is Alex to survive all this? And will she be able to put her damaged family back together?

Review:
Just when you think Anna Belfrage’s Graham Saga can’t get any better, she releases a sixth title in the series and knocks your socks off all over again!

I came to the series at the fourth book, and was instantly hooked. Ever since then, I’ve been champing at the bit to get at the next book, and the next book, and the next book. This sixth installment definitely satisfied my seemingly insatiable appetite for continuance of this family’s story. The characters we already know and love, as well as those we love to hate, are all here, but as ever, nobody is safe – as with any good author, we live in constant dread of losing one of our favourites, so that my fingernails were continually bitten down to the quick as I turned the pages.

There’s always the risk, with an ongoing series, that things will go a little stale, that readers will become bored with the constant drama thrown at the characters, but that is not the case here – I honestly feel that Belfrage is incapable of disappointing with this series as it just seems to keep on giving in terms of plot, character and writing. The witchcraft accusation, coming at a time when to be found guilty of being a witch was to be put to death, is a natural progression and adds some incredibly tense moments, which, when coupled with everything else that is going on at Graham’s Garden, make for a life that is still fraught with danger from all angles, even in a land of opportunity.

This is an unmissable chapter in the saga which will please the fans no end. It’s rare that I give top marks to a book, but in this case, I couldn’t give it anything less.

Reviewed by Kell Smurthwaite

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The Sunrise by Victoria Hislop

In the summer of 1972, Famagusta in Cyprus is the most desirable resort in the Mediterranean, a city bathed in the glow of good fortune. An ambitious couple are about to open the island’s most spectacular hotel, where Greek and Turkish Cypriots work in harmony. Two neighbouring families, the Georgious and the Özkans, are among many who moved to Famagusta to escape the years of unrest and ethnic violence elsewhere on the island. But beneath the city’s façade of glamour and success, tension is building.

When a Greek coup plunges the island into chaos, Cyprus faces a disastrous conflict. Turkey invades to protect the Turkish Cypriot minority, and Famagusta is shelled. Forty thousand people seize their most precious possessions and flee from the advancing soldiers. In the deserted city, just two families remain. This is their story.

Despite hearing about Victoria Hislop, I hadn’t read any of her books. This one arrived to review, and I was intrigued by the idea that she had based her historical story in an existing ghost town. Varosha, within Famagusta, was well known for it’s desirable high rise hotels, and famous visitors. After the population fled, the area was fenced off, and remains that way even today. Apparently the hotels are now crumbling away, and nature is reclaiming the area. I would love to go and see it.

Hislop’s story tells of the rise of the hotels and their owner, and of various visitors to, and residents of the area. She then takes you through the conflict, and it’s effects on them all. The power behind this book is the story telling – I wasn’t sure what to expect, and didn’t know if I would read it, but once I started, I couldn’t give up. The characters creep up on you, and simply had to know what happened. The descriptions are vivid and easily imagined. Highly recommended, and I will be looking out for more from this author.

 

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Red Rising by Pierce Brown

This is quite a difficult book to review – there are things I want to talk about, but I don’t want to give away key points of story. Red Rising is set on Mars, in a far distant future. We’re introduced to Darrow, who’s a miner working under the surface.. mining for the elements which will help terraform the planet for humans to live on. His people have lived in the mines for generations, working as humanity’s last hope.

Until Darrow makes a discovery that this is all a lie.. Mars has been habitable for years, as have other planets, and his class, called the Reds, are simply used for slave labour. Don’t worry – that’s all on the back cover!

From here, through a series of events, Darrow is chosen to be disguised (which turns out to be an understatement!) as a Gold, the highest class. He’s taught how to be chosen for training in their command school, so he can eventually infiltrate and lead a rebellion. However, no one really knows what happens in the school, and it’s certainly not what you expect.

I will say now that my biggest problem with the book happens during the change.. there is a lot of world building during the first section, interesting characters, and emotional writing. As Darrow enters the school however, you forget they’re actually on Mars, and the book has a different feel. Plus it’s a confusing feel.. in one way it’s more YA then the beginning of the book, but it’s also harsh and violent. To me, it was as if the author wasn’t fully clear who he wanted his audience to be, and what direction he really wanted to take this first book.

However.. both parts of the book are actually really good, and I think the series has great potential. Now that the school aspect is over, there is so much scope, and I’m really excited to see what happens next. I believe the initial world building will pay off, and the author has already shown he can bring the unexpected.

Pierce has taken aspects of ancient Earth culture, and blended them with aspects of other books. Yes, there are aspects of The Hunger Games and of Ender’s Game, and even Lord of the Flies, but these are combined with echoes of Roman gods and ancient wars. They are the building blocks, which have been twisted and developed into something new. Despite my reservations early in the book, there proved to be a lot to love, and this morning I feel rather bereft now the book is finished. I look forward to getting my hands on Golden Son, and finding out where the journey is going to take me next.

Red Rising is one of the many excellent books brought to you by Hodderscape

 

 

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Competition Time!

Recently we’ve made some tweaks and changes to the forum. Considering the popularity of social media, we’ve shifted the emphasis onto personal reading logs, social reads and general book discussions. The ‘library shelves’ are still there, if you want to discuss a particular author, book or genre, but the heart of our community are readers chatting about their reading.

The lovely people at Hodderscape have kindly agreed to help us relaunch the forum with a fantastic competition. The Hodderscape team are on facebook and twitter, and they also love talking about books!

So, what so we have on offer?

Red Rising by Pierce Brown


The Earth is dying. Darrow is a Red, a miner in the interior of Mars. His mission is to extract enough precious elements to one day tame the surface of the planet and allow humans to live on it. The Reds are humanity’s last hope.

Or so it appears, until the day Darrow discovers it’s all al lie. That Mars has been habitable – and inhabited – for generations, by a class of people calling themselves the Golds. A class of people who look down on Darrow and his fellows as slave labour, to be exploited and worked to death without a second thought.

Until the day that Darrow, with the help of a mysterious group of rebels, disguises himself as a Gold and infiltrates their command school, intent on taking down his oppressors from the inside. But the command school is a battlefield – and Darrow isn’t the only student with an agenda.

TimeBomb by Scott K Andrews (proof copy)


New York City, 2141: Yojana Patel throws herself off a skyscraper, but never hits the ground.

Cornwall, 1640: Gentle young Dora Predennick, newly come to Sweetclover Hall to work, discovers a badly-burnt woman at the bottom of a flight of stairs. When she reaches out to comfort the dying woman, she’s flung through time.

On a rainy night in present-day Cornwall, seventeen-year-old Kaz Cecka sneaks into the long-abandoned Sweetclover Hall, in search of a dry place to sleep. Instead he finds a frightened housemaid who believes Charles I is king and an angry girl who claims to come from the future.

Thrust into the centre of a war that spans millennia, Dora, Kaz and Jana must learn to harness powers they barely understand to escape not only villainous Lord Sweetclover but the forces of a fanatical army… all the while staying one step ahead of a mysterious woman known only as Quil

Smiler’s Fair by Rebecca Levene

Smiler’s Fair: the great moving carnival where any pleasure can be had, if you’re willing to pay the price. They say all paths cross at Smiler’s Fair. They say it’ll change your life. For five people, Smiler’s Fair will change everything.

In a land where unimaginable horror lurks in the shadows, where the very sun and moon are at war, five people – Nethmi, the orphaned daughter of a murdered nobleman, who in desperation commits an act that will haunt her forever. Dae Hyo, the skilled warrior, who discovers that a lifetime of bravery cannot make up for a single mistake. Eric, who follows his heart only to find that love exacts a terrible price. Marvan, the master swordsman, who takes more pleasure from killing than he should. And Krish, the humble goatherd, with a destiny he hardly understands and can never accept – will discover just how much Smiler’s Fair changes everything.

A Love Like Blood by Marcus Sedgewick

If life has taught me one thing, it is this: that the worst monsters are entirely human.

It began in a hole in the ground, in Paris, in the days after the liberation. What I saw there I saw only for the time it takes a match to burn down, and yet it decided the rest of my life.

I tried to forget it at first, to ignore it, but I could not. It came back to me; he came back to me. He hurt people I loved… And so I took the first step on a journey from which there would be no return; a path that led me to fear, to hatred and to revenge – but, above all else, to blood.

Rooms by Lauren Oliver

A compulsive and powerful ghost story narrated by two spirits who inhabit the walls of an old house. It’s a tale of family, ghosts, secrets, and mystery, in which the lives of the living and the dead intersect in shocking, surprising, and moving ways.

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, that’s FIVE books – as well as a Hodderscape Dodo Keyring! :)

All you need to do come and visit us on the forum. You’ll need to visit this thread to enter, details are all over there. It’s UK only I’m afraid, as the publishers are sending out direct. (I’m trying to arrange something for the rest of you, so stay tuned!)

When you’re done, make sure you visit Hodderscape:

Website: www.hodderscape.co.uk
Twitter: @hodderscape
Facebook: www.facebook.com/hodderscape

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The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine

kingfisher clubTitle: The Girls at the Kingfisher Club
Author: Genevieve Valentine
ASIN: B00GEEYWEG
ISBN: 978-1476739083
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton
First Published: 3 June 2014 (Kindle) / 24 June 2014 (audio) / 3 July 2014 (hardback)
No .of pages: 289

Rating: 4/5

Synopsis (from Amazon):
Jo, the firstborn, “The General” to her eleven sisters, is the only thing the Hamilton girls have in place of a mother. She is the one who taught them how to dance, the one who gives the signal each night, as they slip out of the confines of their father’s townhouse to await the cabs that will take them to the speakeasy. Together they elude their distant and controlling father, until the day he decides to marry them all off.

The girls, meanwhile, continue to dance, from Salon Renaud to the Swan and, finally, the Kingfisher, the club they come to call home. They dance until one night when they are caught in a raid, separated, and Jo is thrust face-to-face with someone from her past: a bootlegger named Tom whom she hasn’t seen in almost ten years. Suddenly Jo must weigh in the balance not only the demands of her father and eleven sisters, but those she must make of herself.

Review:
This slick reimagining of the fairytale of the Twelve Dancing Princesses plunges the enigmatic sisters into the heady world of flappers, jazz music, and prohibition era New York City, and it couldn’t have worked better.

The captive heroines are each given their own distinct character, and their story is interwoven with illegal booze, shady dames, even shadier men, and the smoky, mysterious atmosphere of underground clubs. The desperation of the girls drips from every page, and their plight of being held virtual prisoners by a domineering father they never see, makes their precarious little freedoms all the more frenetic.

It retains the fairytale qualities of beautiful damsels in distress (even if the damsels in question are more than capable of taking care of themselves), and help from the most unlikely of quarters. It’s an interesting update on a classic tale, and it doesn’t drag on too long before hitting you with a payoff worthy of The Brothers Grimm – I think they would have approved with how Valentine has handled their original story.

Reviewed by Kell Smurthwaite

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Jane Austen’s First Love by Syrie James

cover44728-mediumTitle: Jane Austen’s First Love
Author: Syrie James
ISBN: 978-0425271353
ASIN: B00G3L7VES
Publisher: Berkley
First Published: 5 August 2014 (Paperback/Kindle)
No .of pages: 400

Rating: 4/5

Synopsis (from Amazon):
Inspired by actual events. Fifteen-year-old Jane Austen dreams of three things: doing something useful, writing something worthy, and falling madly in love. When she visits her brother in Kent to celebrate his engagement, she meets wealthy, devilishly handsome Edward Taylor—a fascinating young man who is truly worthy of her affections. Jane knows a match between her and Edward is unlikely, but every moment she spends with him makes her heart race—and he seems to return her interest. Much to her displeasure, however, there is another seeking his attention

Unsure of her budding relationship, Jane seeks distraction by attempting to correct the pairings of three other prospective couples. But when her matchmaking aspirations do not all turn out as anticipated, Jane discovers the danger of relying on first impressions. The human heart cannot be easily deciphered, nor can it be directed or managed. And if others must be left to their own devices in matters of love and matrimony, can Jane even hope to satisfy her own heart?

Review:
As a big, fat Austenite, I love reading novels written by the well-loved English novelist, but in recent years, I have also begun enjoying all the spin-offs, mash-ups, sequels, and semi-autobiographical material that has been released. This novel is inspired by actual events in Jane Austen’s teen years, and offers up plausible sources of inspiration for her wonderful writing which continues to delight readers to this day.

It’s an interesting look at a headstrong young woman, finding love for the first time, as well as the push to concentrate more on her writing, offering it up to a wider audience than just her immediate family to enjoy. I found this representation of her to be entirely believable and this little glimpse into her formative years is both fun and fascinating. At a time when women were entirely dependent on the men in their family for any kind of social standing, or a living of any kind, Austen struck out and earned a living with her wit and her winning way with words.

Many of the characters from Jane Austen’s established novels, as well as the plots for some of them, can be seen as having their seeds sown in this summer of social engagements surrounding the engagement of her elder brother. It’s a nice, knowing little nod for those of us who are familiar with these works, but is unobtrusive and as subtle as her own subplots.

This is a must-have addition to any Austenite’s collection, and will provide several sublime hours of entertainment in the reading, which will linger long after the last page has been turned.

Reviewed by Kell Smurthwaite

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