The Writer’s Tale by Russell T Davies and Benjamin Cook

The Writer's Tale

The first thing that makes this book interesting is the format.. a series of emails (and the occasional text) between Russell T Davies, and Benjamin Cook, a journalist who writes many of the Doctor Who articles. This communication continues over a year, whilst the scripts for series 4 are being written, and many aspects were hitting the news, such as David Tennant leaving to play Hamlet, and Steven Moffat taking over from Russell.

The emails are pretty much unedited, and they give quite an interesting insight into Russell himself, and fans of his writing will enjoy references to his other shows, such as Queer As Folk, and Bob and Rose.

It’s also a book about writing and story telling – if you ever thought that script writing in particular is easy, prepare to think again!

Above all though, this is of course a book about Doctor Who – it’s just fascinating, as a fan, to see the series change and develop; to see Russell change his ideas; and to see how changing circumstances affect the scripts.

Throughout the book are photos, many of which are stills from the show, and cartoon sketched by Russell. As well, of course, as snippets of the scripts.

This isn’t really a book for the younger fans, but is, at last, one for the adults. Whether you want to learn more about the man, the writing, or the show, there is plenty to keep you reading.

For fans, it’s an absolute must-read!

Published by BBC Books (Includes ‘Open the book’ widget)
Hardback £27.00

Buy at Amazon

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