Posts Tagged With: book review

The Glass Demon by Helen Grant

glass-demon-uk-200

The first death

Seventeen-year-old Lin Fox finds a body in an orchard. As she backs away in horror, she steps on broken glass.

The second death

Then blood appears on her doorstep – blood, and broken glass.

The third death

Something terrible is found in the cemetery. Shards of broken glass lie by a grave.

Who will be next?

As the attacks become more sinister, Lin doesn’t know who to trust. She’s getting closer to the truth behind these chilling discoveries, but with each move the danger deepens.

Because someone wants Lin gone – and won’t give up until he’s got rid of her and her family. Forever.

After a discussion about YA thrillers and horror, Helen kindly arranged for her publisher to send me out a copy of The Glass Demon to try. Helen seems to be classed as a YA writer, but this particular book would definitely appeal to all age groups (as do many YA books, of course).

It’s actually a difficult book to classify, as it’s unclear for most of the story whether this is a straightforward thriller, or if there’s a supernatural element. I felt this added just the right level of uneasiness, and I won’t spoil the story for anyone by revealing which it is.

The story revolves around a mysterious set of stained glass windows – most people deem them to no longer exist, and yet there are some who believe they are hidden away. Lin’s father is a historian, and the Allerheiligen Glass is his latest obsession. The Glass is also meant to be haunted by a demon, who can kill anyone who looks at him.

As people start to die around Lin, and strange things occur, she realises that her and her family are in danger, but she doesn’t know who from.

Add to this that she’s been taken by her father to Germany, and she’s trying to fit into a new school, and cope with the attention of their nearest neighbour, Michael!

As I said, there’s a really good level of threat and unease about this book – there’s lots of tension, which keeps you reading, there is danger, and yet it’s not too disturbing. I think this is the key to the wide range of audience.. I would recommend this to both teen readers, and older (like myself!). Oh, and I’ve added all of Helen’s books to my wishlist! :)

Recommended!

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The Territory by Sarah Govett

territoryanne1_0

At this time of the year, there are many young people revising for, and taking exams, and we all know there’s a lot of pressure on them. However, imagine if a failure could mean being sent to your death…

Noa lives in a near-future where climate change and flooding have drastically reduced the amount of liveable land, now known as The Territory. To be allowed to stay, children at 15 must achieve a high pass on their exams. The rest are sent to the Wetlands, where conditions mean a life of misery, and often death.

If that isn’t difficult enough, the richest children have been equipped with a ‘node’, which allows them to download the information needed for their exams – exams which are based more on fact recall than application…

Sarah has managed to achieve a lot with this book. On one level it’s a compelling dystopian story, and her world building is so well done that this future world feels very real, and scarily close! The flooding which led to the Territory formation is explained, as is the technology available for the rich.

Running through the story however, are also thought-provoking issues, which will make you think a little more about our education system, rich and poor, politics, the climate etc.

Then added to this, is a very real day to day story of a teenager, as she deals with issues of friendship and relationships, school and study.

Despite all this going on, it’s a fast paced story, which kept me turning those pages to find out what would happen next. It has a satisfying conclusion, but is all set up for the rest of the trilogy, which I’m waiting impatiently for.

Firefly Press kindly sent me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review, and is my first experience of this new publisher. I will certainly checking out more of their books, and have already bought Lost On Mars.

Published by Firefly Press April 2015

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The Imagination Box by Martyn Ford

boxThere is a box. Anything you imagine will appear inside. You have one go, one chance to create anything you want. What would you pick?”

Tim is an adventurous 10 year old who lives in the hotel his adoptive parents run. When a professor stays in the hotel, Tim discovers his invention, and is able to make it work. When the professor goes missing, Tim joins up with the professor’s granddaughter to work out what’s going on.

There’s quite a mix within this book – firstly is the main adventure, complete with crazy scientists, people who aren’t who they seem, and the technology. Within are also other issues, such as Tim’s relationship with his adoptive parents, and overcoming his fears.

Central to the story is of course the Imagination Box, asking the reader to consider for themselves.. just what would they wish for for themselves? One of the first things Tim makes is a finger monkey – of course – who’s probably the star of the story. The monkey is called Phil, he talks, and he loves chocolate and bananas!

The Imagination Box is the first in a trilogy, aimed at age 9+, with a mix of adventure and humour.

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True Face by Siobhan Curham

trueface

Don’t show me your tweet-face

Or ur txt spk

Show me your True Face 

And let your heart speak.

Siobhan Curham has an important message for young people in her book – to work out who they are, and to be themselves. It’s backed up by a website http://www.truefacerevolution.co.uk and it’s obviously something she’s very passionate about.

The first part of the book encourages the reader to keep a journal, and Siobhan guides them through exercises to work out what they were like as children, and what they want to be right now, whilst turning the inner negative voice into a positive one.

After this, she looks at being yourself in various circumstances, such as dating, friendship, finding your style etc.

Whilst it’s aimed at young people, there are aspects within which any age group can make use of – although I would really like to see a version aimed at older readers, who may have very different types of negative aspects and experiences to overcome and turn around.

I’m not sure that many teenagers would fully engage in the journal aspect of the book, but it’s done in such as way that it’s not essential.. it’s quite possible to consider the aspects in your mind, although taking more time with it may help. Overall though, the messages within this book are so important, and I hope it makes its way into every school library – and I hope young people start to take notice!

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Starborn by Lucy Hounsom

Starborn-cover

Kyndra’s fate holds betrayal and salvation, but the journey starts in her small village. On the day she comes of age, she accidentally disrupts an ancient ceremony, ending centuries of tradition. So when an unnatural storm targets her superstitious community, Kyndra is blamed. She fears for her life until two strangers save her, by wielding powers not seen for an age – powers fuelled by the sun and the moon.

This is always going to be a difficult review to write, because Fantasy is not something I read regularly, so I therefore find it hard to make comparisons with other authors, books etc. I’m not really sure what regular fantasy readers feel makes a good fantasy book, so I may be way off. All I can say is that personally, I thought it was excellent, and I loved it. :)

As I said, fantasy is not something I read regularly, but after chatting to the author about another book we both loved, I decided to take the publisher up on their kind offer of a review copy. I enjoyed the writing style from the beginning, and I knew I was hooked once Bregenne and Nediah turned up, and especially once I started to learn more about their powers – what can be better than a power fuelled by the sun or the moon?!

I really enjoyed the world building from Lucy – I only get to read my books in short bursts, so it doesn’t take much for me to get confused, but not once did I feel lost in this world. From the powers I’ve already spoken about, to airships, to a hidden city, I was able to lose myself in it every time I picked it up.

Kyndra is a great main character, who goes through a lot during the book, but my favourites were Bregenne and Nediah, who are excellent characters both on their own, and also as a pair. They are coupled by their opposing powers, but there’s also their own personal relationship to explore.

I don’t want to go into any more details, but anyone who follows me on twitter will know how much I’ve enjoyed this one. There’s a wrapped up story within this book, but it’s nicely all set up for the next book, which I can’t wait to get my hands on!

Find out more at LucyHounsom.com

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Whither Thou Goest by Anna Belfrage (Graham Saga #7)

Whither Thou GoestTitle: Whither Thou Goest (The Graham Saga #7)
Author: Anna Belfrage
ISBN: 978-1781322413
Publisher: SilverWood
First Published: 1 November 2014 (Paperback/Kindle)
No .of pages: 408

Rating: 4/5

Synopsis (from Amazon):
In their rural home in the Colony of Maryland, Matthew and Alex Graham are still recovering from the awful events of the previous years when Luke Graham, Matthew’s estranged brother, asks them for a favour.

Alex has no problems whatsoever ignoring Luke’s sad plea for help. In her opinion Matthew’s brother is an evil excuse of a man who deserves whatever nasty stuff fate throws at him. Except, as Matthew points out, Luke is begging them to save his son – his misled Charlie, one of the Monmouth rebels – and can Charlie Graham be held responsible for his father’s ill deeds?

So off they go on yet another adventure, this time to the West Indies to find a young man neither of them knows but who faces imminent death on a sugar plantation, condemned to slavery for treason. The journey is hazardous and along the way Alex comes face to face with a most disturbing ghost from her previous life, a man she would much have preferred never to have met.

Time is running out for Charlie Graham, Matthew is haunted by reawakened memories of his days as an indentured servant, and then there’s the eerie Mr Brown, Charlie’s new owner, who will do anything to keep his secrets safe, anything at all.

Will Matthew deliver his nephew from imminent death? And will they ever make it back home?

Review:
The Graham Saga is a series that just keeps giving! You want cracking characters? They’re in there. You crave action and intrigue? Look no further! You fancy some peril and deliverance? It’s right here, people! You like historical settings, but enjoy modern people out of their time? This is the series for you! And with Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander books now hitting our television screens, we can expect The Graham Saga to pick up interest from fans of Gabaldon as they look for more wonderful works to entertain them with the kind of rich plots and sweeping landscapes they already love, because if you like Gabaldon, you’ll LOVE Belfrage!

Once again, we see Alex (a modern woman out of her time) and her family almost torn apart and having to pull together to make it out the other side of the trials and tribulations thrown their way. Much of it is edge of the seat stuff and one genuinely found it incredibly difficult to put down the book and return to one’s own day-to-day life (as one must occasionally, to do everyday things such as feeding the kids, getting them to school, and making sure we have a nice, clean home in which to live – seriously, if I could have an extra few hours in every day just to read these books, I’d be a very happy woman!).

Fans of the series will find this latest (7th!) installment delivers everything one would expect and then some – an exciting, often intense, adventurous, romantic saga of a story that will keep readers gripped till the last page is turned, and then leave us gasping and gagging for more. It seems Belfrage cannot put a foot wrong – long may she continue to give us more installments in this truly wonderful series!

Reviewed by Kell Smurthwaite

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Endgame: The Calling by James Frey

Endgame: The Calling is part of something much bigger. It’s not something I know much about, so I will simply link to this article for those who wish to learn more. As for the book, I almost bought it in Waterstones, but decided against, as I wasn’t sure about the format. I then managed to get a kindle edition to review – this gave me the oppertunity to try the story, but I do feel that something was missing in this format, and I’m sure I’ll eventually buy the book.

So, to the story – it’s written in the present tense, and is written with sharp, snappy sentences. It jumps between characters, someof whom work alone, some who join up – so it gives different viewpoints and insights.

The basis of the story is that there are 12 main lines, each of which is represented by one young person. These twelve are trained all their lives, and at the age of 20 they ‘retire’ and pass on the responsibility to someone new.

The twelve are brought together after twelve meteors strike the earth, and they are informed that they will now battle each other to find 3 keys, and they are fighting for their line, as everyone else will die. The keys belong to ancient people from space, so there is a slight SF aspect to it.. maybe one which will be expanded on in the next two books.

Each of the twelve ‘players’ have their own backgrounds, feelings and styles, and there were a few I wanted to do well. It’s a harsh book, with violence and deaths, but it all seems acceptable and relevant to the story, so it’s not shocking.

It’s style may not be for everyone, but I found it’s pace quite addictive. I enjoyed it, and quite intrigued to see where the second book goes, but I have a feeling that some of the finer points passed me by.  I’m a little confused as to whether I enjoyed it, and whether I would recommend it – but there definitely is something intriguing, and I would certainly recommend anyone interested to check out a sample to see what they think.

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My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga

heart

I’m getting higher and higher and I feel the swing set creak.

‘Be careful,’ he says.

‘Why?’ I’m not thinking about being careful. I’m thinking about one last push, of letting go, of flying, and of falling.

‘You aren’t allowed to die without me,’ he whispers.

In her debut YA book, Jasmine tackles a very difficult subject, teenage suicide. Aysel is the daughter of murderer, and the effects this may have on her in the future scare her so much she decides she no longer wants to live. Roman is dealing with a terrible event in his life, and he’s looking for a suicide partner.. and it’s this which brings them together.

First to my reservations about the book – the opening section is quite bleak, mainly because Jasmine writes so well about how these young people are feeling. As a parent, it terrified me to think that young people could feel this bad, and not realise that there’s help out there. To feel that suicide is the only answer, and then to seek someone out so they can encourage and help each other.. well, it was hard to read. I also had reservations about young people with depression reading the book.

However, as the book progresses, you can see a change in Aysel, as she begins to face up to the way she feels, and her future. She also starts to feel a strong connection with Roman, but not because of the reasons they joined up. Things change for Aysel, but she now needs to make them change for Roman too.

This book proved hard to put down – both characters had my heart aching for them, wanting them to see that trying to struggle alone was not the answer, and that things could get better. The feelings of depression, worthlessness and guilt are so well written – but so also is the recovery. It isn’t a case of Aysel simply falling in love and realising the world is all sunny, it’s a case of discovering the power of relationships, and of talking and sharing.

This will be published by Hodder in February 2015, and I highly recommend you add it to your wishlist.

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Whiny Whiny Rhino by McBoop

whiny-whiny-rhinoTitle: Whiny Whiny Rhino
Author: McBoop
ASIN: B00MBZNXJW (Kindle e-book)
Publisher: Blue Blanket Publishing
First Published: 131 July 2014 (Kindle)
No .of pages: 32

Rating: 4/5

Synopsis (from Amazon):
Can Tiny Tiny Rhino have a fun day?
Or will all of his whining get in the way?

If you’ve ever been worried to try something new,
then Whiny Whiny Rhino is the book for you!

From creative team McBoop, comes the story of a whiny rhino with a big head and an even bigger imagination.

Review:

This fun rhyming story with delightful, colourful illustrations, is a joy to read along with small children. They can enjoy the story with all its jungle characters, and also identify with the small rhino who is so wary of new things that he’s missing out on all the fun, while learning that although trying something new can be a scary thing, it can also be exciting.

It’s a lovely book for those kids who just need a little extra confidence, as it can open the door to taking about any fears they have, while seeing that sometimes you just need to take that leap of faith and enjoy the ride.

Reviewed by Kell Smurthwaite

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Madame Picasso by Anne Girard (aka Diane Haegar)

9780778316350.inddTitle: Madame Picasso
Author: Anne Girard (aka Diane Haegar)
ISBN: 978-0778316350
Publisher: Mira Books
First Published: 26th August 2014 (paperback / audio) / 1st September 2014 (Kindle)

Rating: Like a Star @ heavenLike a Star @ heavenLike a Star @ heavenLike a Star @ heaven

Synopsis (from Amazon):

The mesmerizing and untold story of Eva Gouel, the unforgettable woman who stole the heart of the greatest artist of our time.

When Eva Gouel moves to Paris from the countryside, she is full of ambition and dreams of stardom. Though young and inexperienced, she manages to find work as a costumer at the famous Moulin Rouge, and it is here that she first catches the attention of Pablo Picasso, a rising star in the art world. A brilliant but eccentric artist, Picasso sets his sights on Eva, and Eva can’t help but be drawn into his web. But what starts as a torrid affair soon evolves into what will become the first great love of Picasso’s life.

With sparkling insight and passion, Madame Picasso introduces us to a dazzling heroine, taking us from the salon of Gertrude Stein to the glamorous Moulin Rouge and inside the studio and heart of one of the most enigmatic and iconic artists of the 20th century.

Review:
Girard paints her canvas as bright as any Picasso work of art, infusing the story of Eva Gouel with the sights, sounds and smells of Paris and the scandalous folk involved in the cubist art movement in the early 20th century. It’s a fascinating and touching glimpse of the life of a muse that directly affected one of the greatest and most famous artists of his age; one whose legacy will live on forever, remembered as one of the forefathers of cubism.

Eva’s story is a poignant one which is, ultimately, tinged with sadness, but she lived her life to the full, and inspired many of Picasso’s artworks, and Girard presents her as a very real and very credible source of inspiration; a complicated woman from a traditional background who broke tradition at every turn with her unconventional (for the times) relationship with a man who was a known womaniser. Yet it seems Picasso really did adore her, and it is easy to see why.

Through Girard’s masterful strokes emerges a life less ordinary; the life of the extraordinary; a woman who deserves to be remembered and celebrated every bit as much as her larger-than-life artist lover. Read it, and find yourself plunged headfirst into a swirling palette of vibrant, colourful characters, and passions that burn so bright they cannot possibly last.

Reviewed by Kell Smurthwaite

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