Posts Tagged With: William Hussey

Witchfinder: The Last Nightfall by William Hussey

The Last Nightfall is the final instalment in the Witchfinder series, which began with Dawn of the Demontide, and continued with Gallows at Twilight. Each book does offer a separate story, but it’s certainly meant to be read as a trilogy.

As I said in my first review, when I was myself a teen reader, there wasn’t much of a selection, and I my main entry into adult reading was through horror books. The action and fear was something which appealed, but there were many adult themes within which didn’t.

This has certainly changed now, and the Witchfinder book fit in perfectly. They are indeed action packed, they offer fear and scares, and a fascinating world.. and yet they also include teen themes, such as family, friendship, and love. They also offer a welcome change from the usual paranormal fantasy.. vampires don’t sparkle in these books!

The last book in a trilogy is always hard to review, as I don’t want to give anything away. For new readers, I would certainly recommend going straight to the first book and getting started. For those who wish to know whether the ending is worth it, then it’s a resounding yes. The same themes continue, friendships and relationships continue to be explored, and it’s all surrounded by the action packed horror. The increased pace of the second book continues, and it’s yet again hard to put down.

As for the final ending, there was no disappointment. William builds to an exciting and detailed ending, avoiding predictability.

The Witchfinder series has proven to be great reading from beginning to end. Whilst keeping the ‘real world’ firmly in the background, it has brought horror, witches, demons, magic and evil.. as well as friendship and love – not an easy mix to achieve! It’s been fast paced, a joy to read, and is sitting on my shelf waiting to be re-read sometime in the future. Highly recommended!

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Witchfinder: Gallows at Twilight by William Hussey

Gallows at Twilight is the second book in the Witchfinder trilogy, which started with Dawn of the Demontide and will conclude with The Last Nightfall.

The first thing to say is that this trilogy is not for young readers, or the frail at heart.. this may be a young adult book, but it’s a horror story which comes at you at full speed, with humour and teenage relationships all thrown in the mix.

Dawn of the Demontide was a good read, but it’s now obvious that it was somewhat held back by having to set up the stories and characters. Don’t get me wrong, I loved the opening book, but this one ramps it up quite a few notches!

Having not had a chance to re-read the first book, I was concerned whether I’d get lost in this mid-section, but William gets it just right, reminding us what happened, without going over it all again.

Jake is a character who’s already gone through an awful lot for a teen, but in Gallows at Twilight, there’s much more to come. William takes the historical figure of Matthew Hopkins, a witchfinder from the time of the English Civil War, and uses his rather horrifying methods of ‘detection’ to add their own horror.

To get back to this age, William uses a very clever form of time travel – one I can’t help thinking about whenever I get a headache!

Added to the mix is a witches meeting held in Wembley Stadium, a loyal troll and civil war zombie soldiers, to name but a few! There’s a clever mix of old and new, and even some humour.

For young adults who are looking for a fast paced, clever horror, you can’t go wrong with this series. I’d also say the same to older adults too! William, please hurry with the conclusion!

Official Witchfinder Website

Buy Witchfinder: Dawn of the Demontide

Buy Witchfinder: Gallows At Twilight

Preorder Witchfinder: The Last Nightfall

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Witchfinder by William Hussey

Witchfinder

As an enthusiastic young reader (many years ago!) I don’t recall many books being available specifically for teenagers. I very soon moved on to horror writers, such as Stephen King, as there wasn’t much else available, and I know that many other young readers in my age group did the same thing.

As a thirty-something adult, I am now very much enjoying reading many of the ‘young adult’ books which are around now, although I am avoiding the vast array of YA vampire tales! Most of these books are written in such a way that they appeal to teenagers, whilst still offering enough for older readers to enjoy them too, and this is certainly no exception.

The reason I mentioned reading horror as a young person is that the genre seems to appeal to teenage readers, and Hussey’s Witchfinder includes some dark scenes which take this up a level from other YA fantasy, and adds an extra interest. It’s probably not suitable for younger readers, and it’s darker tone is set right from the beginning, so older teens can judge straight away if it’s for them.

The main character, Jake, is introduced as a normal teenage boy, who has a passion for horror, and comics in particular. However, he is soon thrust straight into real world horror, as he discovers witches with their demon familiars, and is faced with abduction and death.

What appears to be a a tale of good versus evil soon develops into more, as Hussey explores whether those who believe they are fighting for good have actually become as bad as those they fight. It also gives us themes of friendship, loyalty and redemption.

As an interesting addition, there’s also mention of Matthew Hopkins, a witch hunter during the time of the English Civil War. It’s a link to history which may well spark some interest and further study.

This is an impressive first book of a trilogy. It’s a complete story in itself, which moves at a fast pace. The second in the trilogy is due to be published in January 2011, and the final instalment in September 2011. If the quality of writing is to continue in these two books, it’s going to feel like a long wait!

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